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Academic Articles // The Politics and Social Aspect of Busking

1. Bogad, L.M. // 2010 // Carnivals against capital: radical clowning and the global justice movement
Social Identities Vol. 16, No. 4, 537 - 557
Limited Access here

Abstract
This essay looks at an international performance phenomenon, which I refer to as tactical carnival, that has developed as a tactic in the toolbox of the burgeoning global justice movement. This movement has been more accurately described as a ‘movement of movements’ due to its great diversity in geography, identity, and
ideology (‘One no, many yeses’ is one of its main slogans). As connections and coalitions are forged between Bolivian miners, American anti-corporate activists, Polish organic farmers, etc., organizers have begun to coordinate a celebratory form of protest that involves unpermitted street parties/processions that occupy public space, both to assert movement identity and importance and often to disrupt state or corporate events/daily business. Movement organizers and writers use the term ‘carnival’ to label these explicitly oppositional events, at which flamboyant costumes, dance, puppets, tricksterism, samba bands and other musical groupings can all be seen. They also seem to refer to ideas about ‘carnival’ that may, to some scholars, seem romantic or overly idealist: nevertheless, these activists are attempting to deploy the ideal of carnival in a practical, experimental way on the street, to create a new, twenty-first century kind of ‘carnival’ that is not calendrically nor spatially circumscribed or permitted by the state but declared and embodied by a movement that identifies itself as global, anti-corporate and anti-authoritarian.

2. LeMay John O. IV, Bates Larry W. // 2013 // Exploration of charity toward busking (street performance) as a function of religion
Psychological Reports: Relationships & Communications, 112, 2, 1-10.
Limited Access here

Abstract
To examine conceptions of religion and charity in a new venue— busking (street performance)—103 undergraduate students at a regional universityin the southeastern U.S. completed a battery of surveys regarding religion, and attitudes and behaviors toward busking. For those 85 participants who had previously encountered a busker, stepwise regression was used to predict increased frequency of giving to buskers. The best predictive model of giving to buskers consisted of three variables including less experienced irritation toward buskers, prior experience with giving to the homeless, and lower religious fundamentalism.

3. Simpson, Paul // 2011 // Street Performance and the City : Public Space, Sociality, and Intervening in the Everyday
Space and Culture, 14(4), 415 - 430
Limited Access here

Abstract
This article examines the performative transformation of street spaces into performance places by considering the practices of street performers. Street performance here refers to a set of practices whereby either musical or nonmusical performances are undertaken in the street with the aim of eliciting donations from passersby. Drawing on ethnographic observations undertaken in Bath, U.K., and situating the discussion in recent conceptions of everyday life and public space, the specific sociospatial interventions that street performances make into Bath’s everyday life are considered. In doing so, the article focuses on the fleeting social relations that emerge from these interventions and what these can do to the experience of the everyday in terms of producing moments of sociality and conviviality. This is also reflected on in light of the various debates that have occurred in Bath as a result of these interventions relating to the increased regulation of street performances. The article then highlights the conflicted and contentious position that street performers occupy in the everyday life of such cities.
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