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Academic Articles // Ethnography & Ethnomusicology // Part #2

6. Ng, Stephanie // 2005 // Performing the “Filipino” at the Crossroads: Filipino Bands in Five-Star Hotels Throughout Asia
Modern Drama, Volume 48, Number 2, pp. 272-296
Limited Access here

Abstract
not available

7. Simpson, Paul // 2008 // Chronic everyday life: Rhythmanalysing street performance
Social & Cultural Geography, Volume 9, Number 7, pp. 807-829(23)
Limited Access here

Abstract
The aims of this paper are twofold. Firstly, taking inspiration from recent criticisms of non-representational theory, namely its over-valorisation of the evental over the contextual, the paper argues for an ecological perspective on practices and performances, which is attentive to both the contextual and the evental. Secondly, and more specifically, this is approached through an examination of the hybrid temporalities of street performance through the gaze of Henri Lefebvre’s ‘Rhythmanalyst’ as the performing body is choreographed into being in the admixture of pre-personal affects and non-human forces of nature (anxiety and frustration, sun and rain) in the playing out of performances. Rhythmanalysis is employed in thinking through the street performance ecology, and particularly the inter-relation of temporal prescriptions placed on performances in Covent Garden, London [linear rhythms], and the natural temporalities of bodies (performers’ and audiences’), the outdoor environment (sun, rain and day), and the performances themselves [cyclical rhythms]. This is pursued in relation to: trying to perform when a crowd will not form; a performance’s encounter with rain; and performing in the July afternoon sun. I conclude by problematizing Lefebvre’s ‘Rhythmanalytical Project’ and speculate on its usefulness in the elaboration of the small details of ‘chronic’ everyday life, both evental and contextual.

8. Patel Alaknanda // 2008 // Music in Public Space Gujarat - a Case Study
SUS.DIV
Free Access here

Abstract
The paper presents a perspective on the role of the arts in cultural dialogue, which reflects on the situation in Gujarat, India, which has been the destination of people of diverse background and cultural practice for centuries. As External Partner of the European Union Project on Diversity, the paper invites us to look at how diversity is managed in arts production in a country, which has embraced plurality as the core of its identity. Contemporary Gujarat has carried on its tradition of cultural and religious diversity with Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Jains, Sikhs, Zoroastrians, Buddhists, and Jews, all having their individual expressions of culture. This essay shows us in the analysis of music production how the distinctive characteristic of multicultural India rests not, as we would assume, on the creation of blend of cultures, a synthesis of some kind or compressed into an overarching motif of religion or caste; rather acceptance and understanding of difference underlies times of social cohesion and peace. The examination of music production in Gujarat observes how music composition is handled, propagated, managed and sponsored in a situation where synthesis is seen as a sign of tension, and where the public assertion of distinct religious identity is the desired norm, particularly in urban centers. The paper evaluates the extent to which music situated in the public arena accommodates cultural diversity in two cities in Gujarat, Baroda and Rajkot, each with rich musical traditions and diversity, but very different histories. It tries to gauge, in a fine tuned comparison, the different motivations behind the organization of public concerts in these two cities, in terms of variety in form, style, performer selection, quality and sustainability against the background of the loss of distinct cultural identities in one city, and their celebration in another.

9. Le Gonidec, Marie-Barbara // 1997 // Musiciens des rues de Paris
Paris : Réunion des Musées Nationaux, p. 141
Free Access here (in French)

Abstract
not available

10. Kaul, Adam // 2013 //Music on the edge: Busking at the Cliffs of Moher and the commodification of a musical landscape
Tourist Studies 0(0) 1 –18"
Free Access here

Abstract
The Cliffs of Moher is one of the most popular tourist sites in all of Ireland, and buskers have
been playing traditional music there for generations. The site and traditional music have each
become powerful metonyms for Irish identity. In this article, I explore the complex and changing
relationship between Irish identity, music, and tourism at the cliffs. In particular, I analyze recent
conflicts that have erupted between musicians and the local tourism authorities which opened a
€32 million award-winning interpretive center there in 2007.
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